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DGCoursereview.com’s Marketplace Forum

Just a partial screenshot from the Marketplace forum link-

DGCourseReview.com. It is quite the resource for disc golfers. First and foremost, their course directory is typically more accurate, more often updated, and all around better than the PDGA.com course directory. The entire site does much more than just give various courses a review and description. There is also a very active forum section that has separate areas for technique advice, equipment opinions, and most notably to me lately: the marketplace. This is where people basically connect with other disc golfers with their various “trades,” “sales,” and “wants.” Like any other free market system, it has it’s downfalls, but tends to be so expansive that you can simply avoid the price gougers and just find a normal person to deal with.

If you only sift through the first page of their marketplace, you may not find anything of interest. You will probably find ten people looking for vintage, OOP discs who are only offering up their basic spare discs as trade bait. Either that or they want $85 dollars for their used OOP disc. Hey, if people are buying discs at that price- good for them! I find the real value of the DGCoursereview marketplace however, when I use their search feature. After looking for a specific disc, a Champion Cobra for example, I found a long list of people either selling or looking for them. It only took me a few minutes of sifting through the results to find a very good condition Champion Cobra for $20.00 dollars shipped. If I wanted to find that on ebay, I’d have to wait a long time for one to appear and then I’d have to pay about double that price after bidding and paying for shipping. The deal I got wasn’t a bargain of a lifetime, but since that disc is OOP in that original mold I jumped at the chance to get one.

There are other obvious downfalls as well. While the sheer number of people willing to share and trade is a positive thing, it also increases the odds of encountering a very stupid person. Have you ever bought or sold something on craigslist? How is it the only person who calls you for a week about the “bike” you’re selling is also the dumbest person in the tri-city area? To them, writing an e-mail with an accurate request and offer for your item is like rocket science. This unfortunately happens to me on a weekly basis with my marketplace thread. I’ll get a notification for a personal message that looks like this:

“u got tbird still?”

I’ll respond right away:

“Yes, I still have the Star Teebird listed on my trade thread. It’s $10 dollars shipped or a trade from my wants list.”

Of course the response is:

“what u want 4 it?”

I’m prepared to cut ties with this genius at this point, but maybe with a few spare minutes at lunch I decide to write him back again:

“The Star Teebird is $10 dollars shipped or I’ll do a trade from my wants list. Here’s a link to my thread- check it out and let me know which option you can do- http://www.mythreadblablabla.com”

I hear back the next day:

“i dont have thos wants disks but like tbirds! lol!”

…and so it goes. Sometimes I’ll luck out and actually get a good trade done with a person who has no grasp on the English language, but I’ve also been burned a couple times. Just recently I traded for a “Wasp tooled Buzzz” and I made sure to ask him, “DOES THE TOOLING ON THE DISC SAY WASP???” He said, “Yep, sure does!” However, when I received the disc, the tooling said “BUZZZ.” He obviously didn’t know what tooling was, or was trying to play stupid to get a trade in his favor. In either case it was my fault for not getting a close up picture of the tooling on his disc, but it still doesn’t make me feel great.

Regardless of all this negative hoopla and disappointment on their marketplace, I still recommend it to anyone who has a few spare moments to compile a list and pictures of discs they no longer want. People want everything. For whatever reason, people go bonkers over Lat64 and Vibram plastic. Some folks even want your old Innova Grooves. Their trades may not always be the best offers, but as long as you remain reasonable you can get a good return for your unwanted plastic. I enjoy giving away unwanted discs to beginners as well, but sometimes it’s nice to get a return on your investment- especially if you bought something you no longer will use. CHECK EM OUT HERE!

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